Workings of Heat Pumps

There is certainly a lot of talk about energy efficiency. Whether it is the media or friends in a coffeehouse, there is always a discussion of some sort about how to get needed heat and cooling without having carbon emission damage the environment. Heat pumps are referred to all the time but aren’t always explained. Before any homeowner does a home improvement that includes a heat pump, it is a good idea to know how these HVAC appliances work.

Taking from the outside and Putting It inside

Heat pumps work in a very unique way. It may seem odd to take hot air out of the environment and put it indoors, but a heat pump will do that and use refrigerant to cool the air if that is needed in warmer months. What is great about heat pumps is that they do not require nearly as much energy as standard furnaces or air-conditioners. Because a heat pump uses electricity, the carbon emission and use of fossil fuel is a fraction of conventional HVAC equipment. Best of all, depending on the type of heat pump to be installed, there are certain tax incentives and rebates available. Heat pumps are not necessarily inexpensive, but they will provide savings on the utility bills for many years after installation.

The Right Type of Heat Pump

A standard heat pump works very well in mild climates but in those areas where winter weather consistently falls below freezing a backup heating system will be needed. Colder states would be best served by geothermal heat pumps, but homeowner has to remember that a lot depends on the size of the property lot and the condition of the soil. If the lot is too small or the soil is too rocky, the installation of the geothermal heat pump will cost a fair amount. Despite these caveats, it cannot be denied that heat pumps provide the right amount of heat and cooling air at a very reasonable price. Heat pumps also reduce the amount of carbon emission into the environment, and that is certainly a public good.

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